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Fixing my AC


JerryC

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I bought the BII and the belt for the compressor was not installed. Previous owner said that it had not worked when he bought it. So it has been that way for several years. I'd like to get it working again. The more I read the more unsure I have become. Every AC part looks old and tired and may be original. The compressor does spin freely when turned by hand.

My initial thought was to replace every thing I can unbolt, basically leaving only the old evaporator in the system and use R-134a. After some reading I see some people saying to use R-12a. So, R-12a vs R-134a ???

When I look at parts online I see hoses say that good for R-12 and R134 but I don't see that for the other hard parts. Should I assume they are still made for R-12 and a R-134a conversion will not affect them?

My eyes tell me that this shouldn't be too big of a job, are they lying to me?
 


XTC90BII

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Are you sure that the system has not already been converted to 134a? Given the age of the BII and the fact that R12 has been hard to get and very very expense since it has been outlawed for autos15 years or so ago. What do the high and low side valves look like? Post a picture of the H&L valves in the lines. High on my 90 is near the driver side of the radiator and the low is on the passenger side up by the dryer. Should have caps on them. You might just be able to put a new belt on and charge the system with 2 cans of 134a. The system should hold 2 lbs. As the system starts to take the 134a the compressor clutch should engage if it is still good and working right. With no Freon the clutch will not engage.

Dennis
 
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JerryC

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Spot on Dennis!

I looked and it does 134 adapters on it. The high side doesn't have a cap on it and it is grungy in there.

I think I'll get another retrofit kit and replace the adapters and have a go at it.
Gotta save up a little money for the vacuum pump and gauges.

Of course there is likely to be the problem that made whoever pull the belt and no guarantee that the conversion was done properly.
 

XTC90BII

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Generally all you had to do for the conversion was swap out the dryer and vacuum they system down and refill with 134a. When the folks in VA who did my conversion did it they just screwed the 134a adaptors onto the R12 shrader (sp) valves. When I went to recharge they system the 134a shader valve would not suppress the R12 shader valve to allow 134a in. So I bought a sit of hoses that had the R12 female end the screwed down onto the male R12 shader valve end and went to a male end for a 134a adaptor so I could connect to my R134a hose going to the can of 134a. works like a champ.

Dennis
 

JerryC

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I read somewhere that you should remove the R-12 valves and use just the R-134 valves in the R-134 adapters???
 

XTC90BII

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Not really. It is just a valve steam if you will. I have seen where a shop that will take out the R12 valve and replace with the complete R134a value which can be very expensive although it does make it permanent. With the R12/R134a hoses I got it works really slick. As long as the o-ring in the R12 valve is still good you should have no problems, or at least it worked for me. The key is having a hose/adaptor that will go from R12 to R134a.

Dennis
 

JerryC

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Well, damn...
HF 2,.5 cfm vacuum pump and gauges, quickly pulled 29 inches of vacuum and held it. Pulled the vacuum for 3 hrs.

Charged it r134a pressures good, air cold.

Compressor knocks. :(
 

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Sounds like the compressor needs to be serviced with some oil. Should make it run a lot smoother with a lot less noise.

Dennis
 

JerryC

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Jerry

Sounds like the compressor needs to be serviced with some oil. Should make it run a lot smoother with a lot less noise.

Dennis
It's worse than that :) Sounds like a bag of hammers. I did try adding a 3oz can of oil but it didn't change it a bit.

It could just be dirt on the pulley but it looks like it wobbles a little

I haven't decided what to do yet. Part of me says to wait until I've got the money to do the whole nine yards (this is why I've had it three years and no AC). Part of me says to replace just the compressor since everything else is good.
 

XTC90BII

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If you replace the compressor make sure you replace the dryer as well. No since replacing the compressor and than having it get plugged with a bunch of old carp coming out of the dryer. If yours was a factory installed AC I am guessing there is no expansion valve. to worry about.

Dennis
 

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After a night to think about it...

I'm leaning back towards replacing everything. Spend a day or two replacing the comp, condenser, dryer and orifice tube.

I pulled the grill and cleaned and straightened fins on the condenser the other day. I just took a close look at what it takes to get the condenser out and somehow the backside of the condenser has a bunch of bent fins. It has had the radiator replaced by the local Ford dealer, but the damage doesn't look something that would happen on a Rad replacement. I'm guessing the engine has been swapped and they dinged the condenser.
One spot is a big smash at the very top.
 

wildbill23c

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JerryC

I'm currently in the process of the same thing on my 88 B2. I replaced the accumulator/dryer, orifice tube, added the conversion kit for the R134A, got everything setup to charge the system and well the compressor is shot, should have known when I tried to change the oil in the compressor that the 1/2-1 teaspoon of oil that came out it would be trouble...yep compressor is shot for sure. Waiting on new compressor and another new accumulator/dryer, and o-ring kit. Sure hope this takes care of my issue.

Yes, replace everything you can, including all the o-rings. You'll need a quick disconnect tool for a few of them, but since you are tearing the system apart anyhow to replace the compressor, you would be wise to replace all the o-rings as well, they're easy to do...coat them with refrigerant oil (PAG46), put everything back together and snug everything town good...DO NOT!!!! crank everything down as tight as you can you'll crush the o-rings and create yourself several leaks as a result. Once you get everything replaced, new compressor installed, etc. vacuum the system down again for about 1/2 hour, shut the valves on the gauges, turn off the vacuum pump, let the system sit for another 1/2 hour and see if the vacuum diminishes, if it does go back and check your connections, and repeat the vacuum process until you get the leaks taken care of.

I got my vacuum pump at HF and it works great, and the gauge set does as well...best money I've spent and now I'm setup to work on automotive AC whenever I have trouble.

If the damaged condenser area looks oily/greasy its probably due to being punctured causing a leak, which caused the AC to stop working in the first place...I'd replace the condenser now, rather than getting everything back together and finding out later that it has a leak.
 

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Thanks. Yeah, I made up my mind today ordered a condenser and will order the rest (new comp, dryer, orifice tube) this week. I'll probably get new hoses as well. With the HF compressor and gauges I'll be in for about $700 when I'm done, if there's no surprises...

I think I know where the orifice tube is, but can you tell me where yours was located? Is it at the bottom of the dryer in what looks be a pain to get to spot? Where the bottom evap line meets the line from the condenser where there are two nuts (not a QD fitting) ?
 

wildbill23c

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Orifice tube in my 88 B2 was in the lower line coming off the evap line. Yep, pain in the ass to get to, but wasn't too bad. Yes, there are 2 nuts at the connection and the orifice tube came right out for me with a little bit of wiggling. I just used a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove it.

I'm waiting for my compressor and drier to arrive, would be nice if it was working now as its gonna be around 100 degrees the next week or so.

I ordered my parts from rockauto.com except for the compressor I got it on ebay as a kit with the compressor, drier, orifice tube, o-ring kit, and the flush solution for $177 with free shipping. Wish it would hurry the hell up and get here so I can get this thing going.
 

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Thanks, yeah I know what you mean bout needing. It is only in the 80's here, but with 90% humidity and it feels miserable. I have another vehicle so the BII doesn't get driven much in the summer. I'm hoping to change that with AC.

That kit is cheap, about $70 less than I'm looking at through autozone. New or reman comp?

I lived in Phx for three years with a different BII, with AC it was just bearable back then. Just too much glass even with tint.
 

wildbill23c

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According to the listing on ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-A-C-Compressor-Kit-With-Clutch-AC-KT-4592/192205683676?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649) its all new parts not remanufactured. Not sure how much of that I'd believe given these vehicles are 20+ years old. However, the price is great, far cheaper than the local parts stores want just for a compressor that is rebuilt and may or may not work out of the box, I'll take my chances ordering online over the garbage my local parts stores seem to have, usually any component I replace and use parts store parts either doesn't work to begin with or doesn't last a week.

Selling my other vehicle and downsizing to something better on fuel and easier to get my mom in and out of. The Bronco 2 is great but not if you are taking care of older people. Love the Bronco 2 and I drive it daily, my 2008 Toyota Tundra has sat in the driveway since I got the new hubs put in this past winter, its such a horrible gas hog I don't drive it unless I just have to, and since it doesn't get used for anything other than DD activities its time to get into something that makes more sense. So I'm working on the bronco 2 getting stuff taken care of on it as I find things that need attention. It runs and drives great, but leaks oil all over...hmm must be a Ford HAHA!!! Also finding it burns oil too so in the near future the engine will be getting an overhaul.
 

JerryC

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Try the high mileage oil, but not the synthetic version. Valvoline high mileage syn-blend worked great, it slowed the leaks way down to almost nothing. I got the bright idea that full synthetic would work better, but it now puffs oil on startup. That started within 50 miles of the oil change to full synth.

Also Lucas PS leak stop seems to have worked on PS leak.
 

wildbill23c

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I run the cheap oil since it leaks it all over and burns oil, not going to pay $4+ a quart to have it leaking all over the ground LOL. After I get the engine overhauled I was thinking of doing the high mileage stuff, ran it in my 96 Jeep GC for years with no issues. I use Valvoline all the time in everything, except the B2 since it loves to leak oil LOL.
 

JerryC

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One benefit to all that oil leaking is the bolts underneath come off easy :) And no rust issues when everything is soaked in oil!
 

wildbill23c

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One benefit to all that oil leaking is the bolts underneath come off easy :) And no rust issues when everything is soaked in oil!
HAHA I've said the same thing. The undercarriage is well lubricated and rust protected.

Well my AC Compressor is supposed to be here tomorrow, so maybe I can jump into that after work tomorrow evening and get it going.
 

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